Fairy Tale Review :: NewPages Guide to Literary Magazines

Fairy Tale Review cover

Fairy Tale Review

About the Fairy Tale Review: Fairy Tale Review is an annual literary journal dedicated to publishing new fairy-tale fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and translations of fairy tales into English.

Contact Information:

Editorial:

Editor: Kate Bernheimer

Department of English, Modern Languages Building

University of Arizona

Tucson, AZ 85721

Email: ftreditorial@gmail.com

Subscriptions:

Wayne State University Press

Leonard N. Simons Building

4809 Woodward Avenue

Detroit, MI 48201

Phone: (313) 577-4603

Website: digitalcommons.wayne.edu/fairytalereview/

Submission/Subscription Information:

Formats: print, online Genres: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, cross-genre, translations

Simultaneous submissions: no Postal submissions: no Email submissions: yes (see website) Online submissions: yes (see website) Reading period: 3/1-8/1 Response time: Responses are sent in September/October each year Payment: yes (see website) Contests: yes (see website) ISSN: 1556-6153 Founded: 2005 Issues per year: 1 Copy price: $10 Average pages: 167 Subscription (ind) 1 year: $15 Subscription (inst) 1 year: $45

Publisher's description: Fairy Tale Review is an annual literary journal dedicated to publishing new fairy-tale fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and translations of fairy tales into English. The journal seeks to expand the conversation about fairy tales among practitioners, scholars, and general readers. Contents reflect a diverse spectrum of literary artists working with fairy tales in many languages and styles.

Recent Issues:

Co-edited by Kate Bernheimer and Timothy Schaffert—alongside the editorial staff of University of Arizona MFA students in new fully funded positions—the 2014 issue contains stories, essays, poems, and artwork inspired by fairy tales, the theme of “emerald,” and the Oz series by L. Frank Baum. These magical and throttling new works show us the imagination’s great breadth—here you’ll find tin cyborgs and dreamers, poignant monkeys, a desultory Aunt Em. And, of course, you’ll encounter Dorothy herself, again and again, twisted and turned by our visionary authors.

This issue (Number 9, 2013) is themed around yellow: the color of my skin, my namesake, the color used to describe four billion plus Asians, and this doesn’t even account for the diasporic population. Yellow, the color of diseased skin and diseased people. Yellow, the color of aging. All these denigrations contained in one color, none of which actually resemble the color itself. Because yellow is bright. It is electric. It inspires. And the works in this issue are as effulgent as yellow itself, but lurking—as yellow always lurks—is something sinister and bold, the color forcing itself up and out, revealing, transforming. Yellow yields metamorphosis.

 

last updated 3/24/2014